Affordable Wind Turbines

Affordable Wind Turbines Affordable Wind Turbines | Residential and Commercial Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

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Energy 101: Wind Turbines- Video


Vertical axis

A vertical axis Twisted Savonius type turbine.

Vertical-axis wind turbines (or VAWTs) have the main rotor shaft arranged vertically. One advantage of this arrangement is that the turbine does not need to be pointed into the wind to be effective, which is an advantage on a site where the wind direction is highly variable. It is also an advantage when the turbine is integrated into a building because it is inherently less steerable. Also, the generator and gearbox can be placed near the ground, using a direct drive from the rotor assembly to the ground-based gearbox, improving accessibility for maintenance. However, these designs produce much less energy averaged over time, which is a major drawback.[24][27]

The key disadvantages include the relatively low rotational speed with the consequential higher torque and hence higher cost of the drive train, the inherently lower power coefficient, the 360-degree rotation of the aero-foil within the wind flow during each cycle and hence the highly dynamic loading on the blade, the pulsating torque generated by some rotor designs on the drive train, and the difficulty of modelling the wind flow accurately and hence the challenges of analysing and designing the rotor prior to fabricating a prototype.[28]

When a turbine is mounted on a rooftop the building generally redirects wind over the roof and this can double the wind speed at the turbine. If the height of a rooftop mounted turbine tower is approximately 50% of the building height it is near the optimum for maximum wind energy and minimum wind turbulence. While wind speeds within the built environment are generally much lower than at exposed rural sites,[29][30] noise may be a concern and an existing structure may not adequately resist the additional stress.

Subtypes of the vertical axis design include:

Darrieus wind turbine

"Eggbeater" turbines, or Darrieus turbines, were named after the French inventor, Georges Darrieus.[31] They have good efficiency, but produce large torque ripple and cyclical stress on the tower, which contributes to poor reliability. They also generally require some external power source, or an additional Savonius rotor to start turning, because the starting torque is very low. The torque ripple is reduced by using three or more blades, which results in greater solidity of the rotor. Solidity is measured by blade area divided by the rotor area. Newer Darrieus type turbines are not held up by guy-wires but have an external superstructure connected to the top bearing.[32]

Giromill

A subtype of Darrieus turbine with straight, as opposed to curved, blades. The cycloturbine variety has variable pitch to reduce the torque pulsation and is self-starting.[33] The advantages of variable pitch are: high starting torque; a wide, relatively flat torque curve; a higher coefficient of performance; more efficient operation in turbulent winds; and a lower blade speed ratio which lowers blade bending stresses. Straight, V, or curved blades may be used.[34]

Savonius wind turbine

These are drag-type devices with two (or more) scoops that are used in anemometers, Flettner vents (commonly seen on bus and van roofs), and in some high-reliability low-efficiency power turbines. They are always self-starting if there are at least three scoops.

Twisted Savonius is a modified savonius, with long helical scoops to provide smooth torque. This is often used as a rooftop wind turbine and has even been adapted for ships.[35]



How wind turbines work



When the wind blows past a wind turbine, its blades capture the wind’s kinetic energy and rotate, turning it into mechanical energy. This rotation turns an internal shaft connected to a gearbox, which increases the speed of rotation by a factor of 100. That spins a generator that produces electricity.

Typically standing at least 80 meters (262 feet) tall, tubular steel towers support a hub with three attached blades and a “nacelle,” which houses the shaft, gearbox, generator, and controls. Wind measurements are collected, which direct the turbine to rotate and face the strongest wind, and the angle or "pitch" of its blades is optimized to capture energy.

A typical modern turbine will start to generate electricity when wind speeds reach six to nine miles per hour (mph), known as the cut-in speed. Wind turbines will shut down if the wind is blowing too hard (roughly 55 miles an hour) to prevent equipment damage.

Over the course of a year, modern wind turbines can generate usable amounts of electricity over 90 percent of the time. For example, if the wind at a wind turbine reaches the cut-in speed of six to nine mph, the wind turbine will start generating electricity. As wind speeds increase so does electricity production.

Another common measure of wind energy production is called capacity factor. This measures the amount of electricity a wind turbine produces in a given time period (typically a year) relative to its maximum potential.

For example, suppose the maximum theoretical output of a two megawatt wind turbine in a year is 17,520 megawatt-hours (two times 8,760 hours, the number of hours in a year). However, the turbine may only produce 7,884 megawatt-hours over the course of the year because the wind wasn’t always blowing hard enough to generate the maximum amount of electricity the turbine was capable of producing. In this case, the turbine has a 45 percent (7,884 divided by 17,520) capacity factor. Remember - this does not mean the wind turbine only generated electricity 45 percent of the time. Modern wind farms often have capacity factors greater than 40 percent, which is close to some types of coal or natural gas power plants.


Wind Turbines

1 kw vertical axis wind turbine affordable wind turbines
1 kw vertical axis wind turbine

Affordable wind turbines 1 kilowatt vertical axis wind turbine is now available as a 4 rotor blade instead of 3 rotor blade system. All the affordable wind turbines units are now 4 rotor blades instead of 3 the unit now starts spinning in even lower wind speeds 3 mph and the unit spins faster in higher wind speeds thus producing more power .

The unit shown rotor blades are made from abs plastic and are removable for packing down and transport. All other 800 watt and above sized affordable wind turbines are built from alloy frames and fiberglass for maximum hurricane resistance , weight reasons , cost and durability .

Windmills vs. Wind Turbines

Sometimes people use the terms “windmill” and “wind turbine” interchangeably, but there are important differences. People have been using windmills for centuries to grind grain, pump water, and do other work. Windmills generate mechanical energy, but they do not generate electricity. In contrast, modern wind turbines are highly evolved machines with more than 8,000 parts that harness wind's kinetic energy and convert it into electricity.

What is a wind farm?

Oftentimes a large number of wind turbines are built close together, which is referred to as a wind project or wind farm. A wind farm functions as a single power plant and sends electricity to the grid.

How wind energy gets to you

The turbines in a wind farm are connected so the electricity they generate can travel from the wind farm to the power grid. Once wind energy is on the main power grid, electric utilities or power operators will send the electricity to where people need it.

Smaller transmission lines, called distribution lines, collect electricity generated at the wind project and transport it to larger "network" transmission lines, where the electricity can travel across long distances to the locations where it is needed. Finally, smaller distribution lines deliver electricity directly to your town, home or business. You can learn more about transmission (Opens in a new window) here.

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